Why the Fens Aren’t Flat and Boring

I hate our boring preconceptions about places. London isn’t rich, crowded and stuck-up, any more than Liverpool is gritty and down-to-earth. They’re just places where people live, love and wish-away their lives. Reality is what we all want to be real. Anyway, that’s why I wrote this brief post about the Fens. That, and the need to sell more subscriptions to my latest Alan Cadbury crime thriller! So read on:

Why the Fens Aren’t Flat and Boring

The bog oaks of the Fens come from trees that were fell thousands of years ago. Gradually buried and preserved in peat bogs, they lay undisturbed until the draining of the Fens.

The bog oaks of the Fens come from trees that were fell thousands of years ago. Gradually buried and preserved in peat bogs, they lay undisturbed until the draining of the Fens.

If you think this place looks flat and boring, well, you’re very much mistaken. It’s full of archaeology and is the perfect place to dispose of a body, but only if you choose the right spot…

When I was first contemplating writing a murder mystery set in the Fens, most people would look at me a bit oddly, as if to say: are you sure that’s such a good idea? After all (the unspoken message went) they’re so very flat and boring.

But they are neither of those things. For a start they aren’t all that flat – especially in the south, where the Isle of Ely dominates the surrounding landscape and can be seen from dozens of miles away. Ely Cathedral is known locally as The Ship of the Fens because of the way it seems to float across the horizon.

Which is appropriate, because this is a watery landscape where the many ancient dykes, drains and rivers conceal more than archaeology. There are dark secrets, and local communities who retain long memories …

– See more at:    DigVentures

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in books, Landscape and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.